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    9 Strange Facts About Owning A Cat

    Secrets of the trade.

    1. Their teeth fall out.

    They have baby teeth just like humans, so don't panic!
    Maritsa Patrinos / BuzzFeed

    They have baby teeth just like humans, so don't panic!

    2. Their whiskers also fall out.

    Maritsa Patrinos / BuzzFeed

    3. They can see ghosts.

    It's science.
    Maritsa Patrinos / BuzzFeed

    It's science.

    4. The 5 second rule won't work in your house anymore.

    Don't risk it.
    Maritsa Patrinos / BuzzFeed

    Don't risk it.

    5. They make strange hunting noises.

    Maritsa Patrinos / BuzzFeed

    6. Black cats are impossible to photograph.

    Maritsa Patrinos / BuzzFeed

    7. They drool.

    They're just relaxed.
    Maritsa Patrinos / BuzzFeed

    They're just relaxed.

    8. The majority of their day is spent sleeping.

    Maritsa Patrinos / BuzzFeed

    9. They grow up insanely fast.

    So take lots of pictures!Maritsa Patrinos / BuzzFeed

    So take lots of pictures!

     

    Posted on 

    The 'Black Hole' Optical Illusion of the Bird of Paradise Explained

    Black doesn't get much blacker than the plumage of male birds of paradise, and new research reveals why.

    The blackest feathers of these rainforest birds are fundamentally differently shaped, on a microscopic level, compared with regular black feathers. The nanostructure of the feather makes them particularly prone to scattering and reabsorbing light, and that in turn makes them not only black, but a dull black that seems to whisk light away.

    "The black is so striking on these birds of paradise. It really does look different," said Teresa Feo, a postdoctoral fellow at the Smithsonian Institution's Division of Birds. "When you look at them, they're so dark your eyes can't focus on them. You almost feel a little woozy." [In Photos: Beautiful Hummingbirds of the World]

     

    Birds of paradise are better known for their dramatically flashy colors than their dark plumage. They are found in places like Indonesia and Australia, and are famous for their long tails, bright colors and showy mating dances.


    A male Victoria's Riflebird (Ptiloris victoriae) male displays its plumage for a female on a vine in Malanda, Queensland, Australia.
    Credit: Martin Willis/ Minden Pictures/Newscom

    Alongside their colorful feathers, though, many species sport matte black feathers that are "just so weird," Feo told Live Science. This weirdness prompted Harvard graduate student Dakota McCoy to start studying the feathers' structure to figure out why they were so good at absorbing light. Feo and several other colleagues would later join the project to help do imaging work and model the optics of the feather structures of five bird of paradise species and two plain black bird species.

    Using scanning electron microscopy and other extremely up-close imaging methods, the researchers found that the super-black feathers have an unusual microscopic structure. Regular black feathers' tiniest microscopic branches typically overlap one another and lie flat, Feo said. The super-black feathers, on the other hand, have a complex branching structure — when viewed up close, the branches look like dried, curled-up oak leaves. Instead of resting flat, they stick up into little forests of branches, like the bristles on a bottle brush, Feo said.


    The super-black feather of the Paradise riflebird (Ptiloris paradiseus), on the right, is so black because of its unusual microstructure, as compared with the black feather from a lesser melampitta (Melampitta lugubris). Even when coated with gold (bottom right), the bird of paradise feather appears super black.
    Credit: Dakota McCoy

    This structure essentially traps light, bouncing it around the tiny voids between branches. The more the light scatters in this way, the more of it inevitably hits the surface of the feather again. And the more times the light hits the feather's surface, the more opportunities there are for it to be absorbed rather than reflected to the viewer's eye.

    A male bird of paradise shows off its optical illusion-like plumage during season 1 of BBC's "Planet Earth."
    A male bird of paradise shows off its optical illusion-like plumage during season 1 of BBC's "Planet Earth."
    Credit: BBC

    In fact, the reflectance of the super-black feathers was nearly as low as many synthetic materials made to be as non-reflective as possible, at between 0.05 and 0.31 percent, the researchers reported Jan. 9 in the journal Nature Communications. For comparison, regular black feathers reflect about 3.2 to 4.7 percent of light.

    Only male birds of paradise have these ultrablack feathers, Feo said, and they are found only on their wings, chests and other places that the birds show off during mating displays. (It's not yet known if other birds have similar structures, Feo said.) The researchers suspect the males use the light-sucking patches of plumage to set off their colorful, iridescent patches in a kind of optical illusion familiar to lovers of kitsch art.

    "If you've ever looked at a velvet Elvis painting, one of those paintings on velvet, those colors pop," Feo said.

    Original article on Live Science

     

    Written by  | 

    Source: https://www.livescience.com/61406-black-hole-bird-of-paradise.html

    49 Beautiful Puppy To Dog Transformations That Will Melt Your Heart

    They grow up so fast. :')

    Recently we asked members of the BuzzFeed Communityto share with us their most adorable puppy to dog transformations. Here are some of the best that were submitted.

    1. This fluffy pup who still loves to strike a pose with Mum:

    "Mother's Day 2015 versus 2016 with my mom and Finnick." — Jenessa
    Jenessa

    "Mother's Day 2015 versus 2016 with my mom and Finnick." — Jenessa

    2. This birthday present which may have grown up to be a little larger than expected:

    "The second photo is on his first birthday!" — cburkard
    cburkard

    "The second photo is on his first birthday!" — cburkard

    3. This little guy who still looks up to Dad:

    — katep46e3b4c34
    katep46e3b4c34

    4. This cheeky girl who's now transformed into a gorgeous lady:

    "Harley Quinn, my German shepherd/border collie mix rescue pupper! (Left: 3 months old; right: 3 years old)." — emilydaniellee
    emilydaniellee

    "Harley Quinn, my German shepherd/border collie mix rescue pupper! (Left: 3 months old; right: 3 years old)." — emilydaniellee

    5. This before-and-after which proves that dogs only get cuter with age:

    "Stitch! Left photo: 9 weeks old. Right photo: 1 year old." — Stitch
    Stitch

    "Stitch! Left photo: 9 weeks old. Right photo: 1 year old." — Stitch

    6. This grown-up lab that can still melt anyone's heart:

    "Tara — 8 weeks old to 14 years." — biancas4e6957548
    biancas4e6957548

    "Tara — 8 weeks old to 14 years." — biancas4e6957548

    7. This great dane who's still just as close to her big brother:

    "Maggie, great dane, at 5 weeks versus 1 year. Still loves to cuddle with her 'big' brother, Rufus!" — emmas4a01d0ff0
    emmas4a01d0ff0

    "Maggie, great dane, at 5 weeks versus 1 year. Still loves to cuddle with her 'big' brother, Rufus!" — emmas4a01d0ff0

    8. This westie who suddenly sprouted some ears:

    "Mollie the westie." — yanm
    yanm

    "Mollie the westie." — yanm

    9. These two rascals who are the definition of aging gracefully:

    "Caine from October 2016 to May 2017. Elderly pom used for reference." — leslien40ad1ccd0
    leslien40ad1ccd0

    "Caine from October 2016 to May 2017. Elderly pom used for reference." — leslien40ad1ccd0

    10. This not-so-little guy with his proud parents:

    "Lincoln, 8 weeks and now." — bethanyc407ef76eb
    bethanyc407ef76eb

    "Lincoln, 8 weeks and now." — bethanyc407ef76eb

    11. This fluffy girl who looks excited to be all grown up:

    "This is Chandler. Chandler is a girl. Yes, Chandler was named after Friends, and from the looks of it, she's grown to be pretty darn happy about it." — meganl44695a63b
    meganl44695a63b

    "This is Chandler. Chandler is a girl. Yes, Chandler was named after Friends, and from the looks of it, she's grown to be pretty darn happy about it." — meganl44695a63b

    12. This little bundle that still loves a good cuddle:

    "Scoots at about 8 weeks and 5 years." — EffingA16
    EffingA16

    "Scoots at about 8 weeks and 5 years." — EffingA16

    13. This tiny sprouter who's grown up to be so handsome:

    "Little TJ isn't little anymore!" — Courtney Wright, Facebook
    Courtney Wright

    "Little TJ isn't little anymore!" — Courtney Wright, Facebook

    14. This beautiful pup who's since learned how to suit up:

    "This is the good doctor aka Doctor Collossus." — bethk44b89be99
    bethk44b89be99

    "This is the good doctor aka Doctor Collossus." — bethk44b89be99

    15. This perfect puppy who's now transformed into an even better boy:

    "Mischa." — jennyv4b5a69c32
    jennyv4b5a69c32

    "Mischa." — jennyv4b5a69c32

    16. This fluff ball who has now mastered his signature pose:

    "Ghost: sitting pretty from 9 weeks old to now." — maggiew4a1bbf204
    maggiew4a1bbf204

    "Ghost: sitting pretty from 9 weeks old to now." — maggiew4a1bbf204

    17. This pup who's swapped the toys for the outdoors:

    "Bo the day we brought him home, and Bo 8 years later." — kaceyt4515a4b77
    kaceyt4515a4b77

    "Bo the day we brought him home, and Bo 8 years later." — kaceyt4515a4b77

    18. This lucky lady who still slays in a bandana:

    "Saidie Bear: She grew into her big ears!" — karinagolightly
    karinagolightly

    "Saidie Bear: She grew into her big ears!" — karinagolightly

    19. This little guy who looks like he hasn't aged a day:

    "Tucker at 8 weeks and 6.5 years old. Still precious!" — kates4de3b0933
    kates4de3b0933

    "Tucker at 8 weeks and 6.5 years old. Still precious!" — kates4de3b0933

    20. This baby bear who's only gotten fluffier with age:

    "Stella as a puppy and Stella now – full grown at 125 pounds!" — ericac4bcd0ef26
    ericac4bcd0ef26

    "Stella as a puppy and Stella now – full grown at 125 pounds!" — ericac4bcd0ef26

    21. This tiny dachshund who's still trying to work out his ears:

    "This is Hans. He's a miniature dachshund and the best pup ever." — meganj18
    meganj18

    "This is Hans. He's a miniature dachshund and the best pup ever." — meganj18

    22. This blue-eyed pup who's now a very handsome devil:

    "Yogi, the yoga master. At 6 months (left) and 5 years (right)." — sarahg48f84b5a6
    sarahg48f84b5a6

    "Yogi, the yoga master. At 6 months (left) and 5 years (right)." — sarahg48f84b5a6

    23. This birthday boy who knows being older means you're wiser:

    "This is Kylo the Australian shepherd! Left is at 6 weeks old and right is on his first birthday!" — anam4b440d254
    anam4b440d254

    "This is Kylo the Australian shepherd! Left is at 6 weeks old and right is on his first birthday!" — anam4b440d254

    24. This grown-up corgi who still enjoys the same old routine:

    "Same shoes, same weather, and same lil' dude. Meet Oliver!" — kristens48b38fada
    kristens48b38fada

    "Same shoes, same weather, and same lil' dude. Meet Oliver!" — kristens48b38fada

    25. This pup who still has the most boopable nose ever:

    "보리 (Bori) at eight weeks and at one year." — deborahm45974f8bd
    deborahm45974f8bd

    "보리 (Bori) at eight weeks and at one year." — deborahm45974f8bd

    26. This handsome guy who looks quite content with how things are going:

    "This is Hugo at 12 weeks versus Hugo at almost 2 years old." — jacquelineg4
    jacquelineg4

    "This is Hugo at 12 weeks versus Hugo at almost 2 years old." — jacquelineg4

    27. This young boy who now has ears for days:

    "This is Beasley, an akita/staffy mix at 8 weeks old and then at 1 year." — rubyorozcog
    rubyorozcog

    "This is Beasley, an akita/staffy mix at 8 weeks old and then at 1 year." — rubyorozcog

    28. This husky who doesn't want to grow up too fast:

    "Luna, 18 months versus 8 weeks." — Candy Guiban-Orbien, Facebook
    Candy Guiban-Orbien

    "Luna, 18 months versus 8 weeks." — Candy Guiban-Orbien, Facebook

    29. This rescue puppy who's looking happier than ever:

    "Meeko at 12 weeks and at 4 years old! He's a boxer/husky/German shepherd rescue." — kellyr4df636d07
    kellyr4df636d07

    "Meeko at 12 weeks and at 4 years old! He's a boxer/husky/German shepherd rescue." — kellyr4df636d07

    30. This pup who's since ditched the training wheels:

    "This is my ride-or-die, Roadie. My boyfriend and I found her as a stray puppy while on a motorcycle trip last summer, and she's been riding with us ever since." — emilieschwenk
    emilieschwenk

    "This is my ride-or-die, Roadie. My boyfriend and I found her as a stray puppy while on a motorcycle trip last summer, and she's been riding with us ever since." — emilieschwenk

    31. This happy guy who will always be a puppy at heart:

    "Baloo showed up one day and stole our hearts. One year later she still has a lot of puppy in her, but she's a whole lot of dog!" — tracyg4f13bfaa7
    tracyg4f13bfaa7

    "Baloo showed up one day and stole our hearts. One year later she still has a lot of puppy in her, but she's a whole lot of dog!" — tracyg4f13bfaa7

    32. This "teddy bear" who refuses to grow up:

    "This is my best buddy, Bear. I adopted him at 6 weeks old while in college and 7 years later we're still inseparable. He's gone from a little teddy bear to a cuddle monster." — cag263
    cag263

    "This is my best buddy, Bear. I adopted him at 6 weeks old while in college and 7 years later we're still inseparable. He's gone from a little teddy bear to a cuddle monster." — cag263

    33. This precious guy who's still got his puppy ears:

    "James from 12 weeks to 7 years (peep those puppy ears that didn’t grow with him)." — BrookeEleanore
    BrookeEleanore

    "James from 12 weeks to 7 years (peep those puppy ears that didn’t grow with him)." — BrookeEleanore

    34. This sprouter who's not quite done with being a puppy yet:

    "At 8 weeks and 6 months with the same toy (minus an ear)." — zsazlen
    zsazlen

    "At 8 weeks and 6 months with the same toy (minus an ear)." — zsazlen

    35. This glow up that will make you want to sign this handsome boy to a modelling agency:

    "Billie at 3 months versus now." — octavioa
    octavioa

    "Billie at 3 months versus now." — octavioa

    36. This before-and-after which proves that size doesn't matter:

    "Stanley, 3 months and 9 months." — Claire Jones, Facebook.
    Claire Jones

    "Stanley, 3 months and 9 months." — Claire Jones, Facebook.

    37. This gorgeous boy who's now trying a more adult look:

    "Lincoln at 3 months versus 1.5 years." — janeloneita
    janeloneita

    "Lincoln at 3 months versus 1.5 years." — janeloneita

    38. This tiny guy who clearly knows his best angles:

    "This is my dog, Meeko, during the first year of his life." — amandar47ed40283
    amandar47ed40283

    "This is my dog, Meeko, during the first year of his life." — amandar47ed40283

    39. This little sausage who's still rocking his spots:

    "Willie — 8 weeks to 2 years...little bit longer, whole lot cuter." — caseyd4b71fad47
    caseyd4b71fad47

    "Willie — 8 weeks to 2 years...little bit longer, whole lot cuter." — caseyd4b71fad47

    40. This pup that will always have a heart of gold no matter his size:

    "This is Bear, the week we brought him home versus two years later! He's the sweetest lil' (giant) pup and follows me everywhere. Bernese/chocolate lab mix!" — hannah
    hannah

    "This is Bear, the week we brought him home versus two years later! He's the sweetest lil' (giant) pup and follows me everywhere. Bernese/chocolate lab mix!" — hannah

    41. This blue-eyed angel that's still as gorgeous:

    "From a teeny tiny pupper at 3 weeks old to a somewhat bigger puperoni at 11 weeks." — sarahs4f3920975
    sarahs4f3920975

    "From a teeny tiny pupper at 3 weeks old to a somewhat bigger puperoni at 11 weeks." — sarahs4f3920975

    42. This little bundle that looks even better grown up:

    "My baby Bodie used to look like a bear cub, now he's a full-grown, handsome, fun doggo." — emilyp4f90f7f07
    emilyp4f90f7f07

    "My baby Bodie used to look like a bear cub, now he's a full-grown, handsome, fun doggo." — emilyp4f90f7f07

    43. This shiba who still can't resist taking a nap:

    "Flynn! 10 weeks, 16 weeks, 1.5 years, and 2! He is a wonderful fur child whose human siblings love very much!" — Hilary Hawthorne, Facebook
    Hilary Hawthorne

    "Flynn! 10 weeks, 16 weeks, 1.5 years, and 2! He is a wonderful fur child whose human siblings love very much!" — Hilary Hawthorne, Facebook

    44. This little guy who's now turning heads:

    "Charlie, on the left only a 3-month-old pupper, on the right a heckin' 5-year-old bamboozler!" — Jolandala, Twitter
    Jolandala‏/@TJliciousMonkey

    "Charlie, on the left only a 3-month-old pupper, on the right a heckin' 5-year-old bamboozler!" — Jolandala, Twitter

    45. This adorable puppy who clearly loves the outdoors:

    "Chance!!" — taylorf4fa6f035c
    taylorf4fa6f035c

    "Chance!!" — taylorf4fa6f035c

    46. This grown-up girl who looks ready to take on the world:

    "Miss Franke is a big girl now." — Lena Kilborne, Facebook
    Lena Kilborne

    "Miss Franke is a big girl now." — Lena Kilborne, Facebook

    47. This fur baby who is now an adorable fur monster:

    "My baby boy Winston." — Jade Moore, Facebook
    Jade Moore

    "My baby boy Winston." — Jade Moore, Facebook

    48. This gorgeous girl who luckily grew into her ears:

    "My lil' darling, Jazzy! Few months old versus 7 years." — Brooke Reilly
    Brooke Reilly

    "My lil' darling, Jazzy! Few months old versus 7 years." — Brooke Reilly

    49. And this cheeky guy who proves that old habits die hard:

    "Lily the day we got her (1 month old) versus the end of June (1 year old) — still eating grass after over a year." — gh0stkat
    gh0stkat

    "Lily the day we got her (1 month old) versus the end of June (1 year old) — still eating grass after over a year." — gh0stkat

     

    Posted on 

    Source: https://www.buzzfeed.com/h2/vflt/ishabassi/tbh-i-cried-a-little-while-writing-this-post-because-dogs?utm_term=.bixgvk0xy#.bpJpZNr8K

    Chameleon Bones Glow in the Dark, Even Through Skin

    A new study reveals that the color changers can also glow in the dark under ultraviolet light.

    By 

    Chameleons are color-changing, tongue-whipping, eye-rolling lizards. But did you know they also glow in the dark?

    A new study published this week in the journal Scientific Reports revealed just that. It's the first time researchers have reported bone-based fluorescence in vertebrates.

     

    GLOWING UP

    The proteins, pigments, and other materials that make up bones help them to glow under ultraviolet light—just think of how your florescent smile lights up under a black light. We've known that 75 percent of deep-sea creatures can glow in the dark, so this light-emitting characteristic is common in marine species.

    But biogenic fluorescence is rare in terrestrial vertebrates. Only in March was the first fluorescent frog discovered in the Amazon. (These animals glow for science.)

    On January 15, a team of German researchers published a paper showing that the bones of chameleons glow under UV light. They tested the light rays on 160 specimens that spanned 31 species of Calumma chameleons, which are endemic to Madagascar. Micro-CT scans revealed that a bright blue glow emanated from the lizards' skeletons and shined through their skin.

    Tubercles, or small, rounded, bony projections, dot the faces of chameleons. The lizards also have four layers of thin skin, which have different pigments to help them change color. When the scientists shined a UV light over the chameleons, the glowing tubercles shined out from their skulls and through their skin.

    "We could hardly believe our eyes when we illuminated the chameleons in our collection with a UV lamp," lead author David Prötzel, a doctoral student at the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology, says in a statement. "And almost all species showed blue, previously invisible patterns on the head, some even over the whole body."

    The scientists said the gaps where the tubercles peaked through the skin were "windows" that helped UV rays reach the bone and get absorbed.

    For chameleons, the glow likely shines brighter than it does for humans. Blue is a rare color in the lizards' forested habitats, so glowing in the dark would make them stand out from their green and brown backdrop.

    SHADE SHIFTERS

    Chameleons can change color depending on a lot of factors. A shift in mood, perhaps triggered by fear or anger, can cause them to shift shades, as well as varying temperature, humidity, and amounts of light. Males will sometimes make themselves brighter in order to attract females and establish dominance; more submissive shades are brown and gray. A change in color can also show if females are accepting or rejecting male partners, or it can indicate pregnancy.

    But chameleons can't change to any color they want, and they can't exactly mimic their environment. A lizard on a striped or polka dotted background won't be able to adopt that funky pattern. (Read: "Inside the Secretive World of Florida's Chameleon Catchers")

    Instead, species have a certain array of patterns and colors they can take on. Nerve impulses and hormone shifts can cause their skin to expand or shrink and blend different layers for different colors and patterns. (Read: "The Colorful Language of Chameleons")

    Scientists aren't quite sure yet why chameleon bones glow in the dark. Since glowing tubercle patterns vary among species, the trait could help them recognize members of the same species. The researchers also found that males have more tubercles than females, a sexually dimorphic characteristic that could indicate when chameleons are ready to mate.

    The glow-in-the-dark trait could also be used to protect chameleons against excessive sunlight, hide them from UV light detection, attract pollinators, or scare off predators. But ultimately, even more glowing land animals might be waiting to be discovered.

    Source: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/01/chameleon-bones-florescent-ultraviolet-light-spd/

    SIGN: Justice for 4 month old puppy euthanized from severe neglect

    TARGET: DUVAL COUNTY PROSECUTOR'S OFFICE

    When police entered the home of Susann Seeber in Jacksonville, Florida, what they found was devastating: 8 emaciated St. Bernard dogs, kept on chains, in a small warehouse reeking of feces and urine. The animals were surrounded by their own waste, with no food or water in sight. One dog had duct tape on its legs, which Seeber claimed was for a "spider bite."

    Especially heartbreaking was the grave condition of a 4-month-old puppy who was unresponsive and suffering from seizures. Tragically, the puppy was deemed past the point of recovery, and veterinarians decided to euthanize.

    This innocent puppy deserved much better than a short life filled with suffering -- and these dogs' abuser must not be permitted to harm any more animals.

    Seeber has been charged with animal cruelty, and it is now crucial that the courts make it clear that animal abuse and neglect will not be tolerated. Sign this petition to urge the Duval County Prosecutor's Office to prosecute to the fullest extent of the law, and ensure this individual is never allowed to keep an animal again.

    Source: https://ladyfreethinker.org/sign-justice-for-4-month-old-puppy-euthanized-from-severe-neglect/

    Your Chance to Name Baby Lion Cubs Born at Wildlife Waystation

    REFUGE, HEALING, EDUCATION

     

    The three lion cubs - two girls and one boy - were born September 14.  Their father is Tangassi and their mother is Gypsy. "During Tangassi's intake, we understood he was vasectomized," said Martine Colette, Founder.

    "He was here a number of years before we put him together with Gypsy. No one was more surprised than we were," said Colette. Wildlife Waystation has a strict no breeding policy. "We take great precautions to spay and neuter our animals as necessary."

    The triplets are being raised by their mother. "They are hale and hearty," said Colette. Their father lives in the enclosure adjacent.  The family was evacuated during the recent Creek Fire which burned much of the property.  

    Wildlife Waystation is announcing a naming opportunities for cubs. Anyone can submit a name for consideration with a $10.00 donation for each submission. There is no limit to the number of submissions. Names are to be submitted via letter or online at www.wildlifewaystation.org. Submissions must include the person's name (parent's name for minors), telephone number, email and the suggested name(s) for a lion cub.  

    The winners of the naming contest will be invited with one guest to visit Wildlife Waystation, enjoy a luncheon, and tour the sanctuary. A plaque with the winners' names will be placed on the cubs' enclosure. A professional photo of the lion cub will also be provided. Winners, and the selected cub names, will be announced on April 30, Colette's 76th birthday.

     

    As a non-profit organization, the Wildlife Waystation is dependent on donations, sponsors, bequests, members, and grants to raise the revenue necessary to care for all our animals. There are many ways to help: 

    Sponsor An Animal       Volunteer      Become A Member      Work Parties

    Wish Lists     Support Partners: iGive, Amazon Smile, Ralphs Member Card, Vons Club Card

    Acknowledgements     Donate Your Car - If you have a truck, call 818-899-5201

    Planned Giving: Bequests, Securities, Charitable Lead Trusts, Charitable Remainder Trusts, Life Insurance Policies and Real Estate Gifts

    Does your company have a gift matching program? Companies like Verizon, AT&T, American Express, Disney and more many will match your donation. 

    Set up a recurring donation ~ a little bit every month adds up

     

     

    Questions?  Call 818-899-5201

    Wildlife Waystation

    14831 Little Tujunga Canyon Road

    Sylmar, CA 91342

    www.wildlifewaystation.org

    Wildlife Waystation is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt, non-profit organization.